The Language of the Dead

by Daniel Bourne

image

One of those days when the earth

seems to make its own light, even during a hard rain

the autumn leaves radiant. We have just visited 

the grave of a murdered Polish priest. We watched 

workmen cut flowers and put them in vases. Later,

we buy postcards in the church kiosk: the battered

         body

fished out of the reservoir; the village road sign

where he was kidnapped; each photo a station

of the twentieth-century cross. Such a day

— Stanza Break 

weights the earth. When we go home to warm tea,

to the heat of our bodies, the heft of our dictionaries

with their broken spines, we try to break through

to the language of the dead. Tomorrow,

we will shop in the stores, but no one

will acknowledge our presence.

(Warsaw, October 1985)

Read More

Poetry that Sticks:

Woman’s Mummy Shroud, Egypt ca. AD 150

by Laura Scheffler Morgan

They are discussing restaurants, those

across the street and some further; bread,

she says she wants, I thought I saw one with fresh bread.

                   Just above the woman’s head, a vulture holds splayed

feathers in its grip The scavenger is protecting the woman—

preserving her, the museum note says…

Read More

To Katherine: At Twelve Weeks

by Joelle Biele

Those nights nothing could soothe you,

and nothing explained your love of Fillmore’s

Circus Bee, the crash of Samson and Delilah,

or any full-throttle Sousa at 2 AM.

Midnight maestro, you conducted the spheres.

We drew our sabers and danced we waltzed

moon rivers, we swayed with the ladies

of sorrow, we scat with the ladies of joy.

The house a sudden hush, wed whistle 

with the panes, measure the hours with the wind,

we’d study the alphabet of sleep.

Do you remember the dark swelling up,

the snow, the white and icy fields?

My love lost in grief, you were my claire de lune

Read More

When us Artful Dodge assistants at The College of Wooster aren’t reading through submissions, vetting writing, and doing housekeeping, we’re also students. At The College of Wooster, every student is required to complete a Independent Study project, or senior thesis, within his, or her, major. Here’s the Senior Thesis of one of our Editorial Assistants, Aaron Winston, that was presented at a lecture series last week. As an English Literature and Philosophy double major, Aaron is currently tackling the philosophical question of selfhood and using James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man as a case study. 
Here’s an abstract:

Individuals are not static creatures but rather constantly adapting to new experiences. I thus suggest that we are apt to engage in actively re-interpreting our past. Through this faculty, we gain understanding of ourselves as being in the world based upon reflectively interpreting ourselves as we have been in the world. But this self-reflective process must be structured; I have  thus argued that this structure is narratival because it enables a continual process of re-interpretation of past experience on the basis of new experiences. In this way, I turn to Stephen Dedalus in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man as a case study to grapple with the questions of narratival selfhood. I specifically look to the place of Joycean Epiphany in affecting changes with the individual’s self-conception. 

When us Artful Dodge assistants at The College of Wooster aren’t reading through submissions, vetting writing, and doing housekeeping, we’re also students. At The College of Wooster, every student is required to complete a Independent Study project, or senior thesis, within his, or her, major. Here’s the Senior Thesis of one of our Editorial Assistants, Aaron Winston, that was presented at a lecture series last week. As an English Literature and Philosophy double major, Aaron is currently tackling the philosophical question of selfhood and using James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man as a case study. 

Here’s an abstract:

Individuals are not static creatures but rather constantly adapting to new experiences. I thus suggest that we are apt to engage in actively re-interpreting our past. Through this faculty, we gain understanding of ourselves as being in the world based upon reflectively interpreting ourselves as we have been in the world. But this self-reflective process must be structured; I have  thus argued that this structure is narratival because it enables a continual process of re-interpretation of past experience on the basis of new experiences. In this way, I turn to Stephen Dedalus in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man as a case study to grapple with the questions of narratival selfhood. I specifically look to the place of Joycean Epiphany in affecting changes with the individual’s self-conception. 

A Couple of Scars on My Back

by Eric Anderson

Before I was born, my mother knew. She could tell because my movements felt like flutters, because the birds wouldn’t leave her alone. Grackles on the windowsill, so many starlings in the trees. When the wind blew, their feathers rustled like black leaves.

IN a bikini, she would sunbathe in the backyard, rubbing lotion on her proud belly, rising, inexorable as bread. Inside, my world was bright and bloodcolored, like the light when you close your eyes. I like to think I can remember her hands, two shadows passing across the glow.

She fell asleep that way, once, and woke up with a crow perched on her stomach. The bird cawed and pecked, making a tiny triangular cut. My grandmother ran into the house, calling for cotton balls, alcohol, Band-Aids!

When I was born with wings, no one was surprised. The wings were little and white, but already strong enough to almost lift me out of my grandmother’s hands. Only the placenta held me down.

My grandmother cut the cord, then handed the scissors to my mother, who snipped off both my wings, the way she trimmed the roses to keep them from growing wild.

She put them in a jar for me. When I shake it, just right, I can feel myself flying.

Read More

A Fairy Tale: By David Moser

image

Well anyway Goldilocks has just been discovered snoozing away in Baby Bear’s bed. What the fuck are you doing in my bed, he asks in a very unfairytale-like manner. Goldilocks is nonplussed. This is not the manner in which she is accustomed to being spoken to. Having always been very blonde and very cute, she has come to expect spontaneous affection and loving adoration from strangers. This little ursa minor has ruffled her feather so to speak. Despite all this, her middle-class upbrining tells her to follow the path of least resistance. Who are you, she asks, instinctively adopting a wide-eyed, innocent demeanor.

 A quick inventory reveals:

  1. an empty porridge bowl (Baby Bear’s)
  2. five or six crumpled pieces of tinfoil from a package of Hershey’s chocolate kisses (Mama Bear’s)
  3. a pipe (Papa Bear’s) resting upon the (still warm) T.V. set and containing the unsmoked residue of a controlled substance

Papa Bear, always the sleepy slow-witted, and benign patriarch, has failed to grasp the full import of the siuation. To him, the intruder has violated the sanctity of his abode, nothing more, and this rather simple-minded appraisal of the events has numbed his sensibilities to the crucial problems, i.e. the potential impact of Goldilock’s considerable charms upon Baby Bear’s budding sexuality, Mother Bear’s consternation at the thought of a possible disastrous intra-species pairing, and the question of justice with regards to the porridge supply.

She is to be forgiven for her tactics. They are, after all, tactics of survival. Everyone understands survival.

She appeals to the bears on the basis of her need, her weakness, her humanness. That is her strategy. It has never failed her. A recent close call:

“Honest, babe, I was there so long and I was just so lonely and missing you so bad and there he was, y’know, and he was so nice and most of all he reminded me of you, babe, he reminded me of you a whole lot and so, well, what else could I do?”

It works. Individuals die, species survive and, along with them, tactics for survival. Goldilocks knows this. The only thing troubling her now is that she is out of her element, out of that cozy, comfortable context she knows so well. This is a different world, a world of fur and claws and grunts and very bad breath. Can she depend upon survival instinct in this world? Can they (the bears) be manipulated? (They look so gullible in their ill-fitting clothes, trying to stand on two legs and clumsily attempting to grasp knives and forks in their paws. They’re so cute, after all.)

“Forgive me if I seem ill-mannered,” she says, a drop of porridge still clinging incriminatingly to her lower lip, “but I chanced upon your little cottage and I was scared and lost and ever so hungry, and well, what else could I do?

Read More

Dawn

image

(Photograph by Aaron Winston)

"Dawn"

by Nicholas Kolumban

I see you eyes without the glasses.

They are light green, life-size,

a masculine openness in them.

Your fingers thick, tanned in April.

I lay my mouth in your fresh palm.

A car toots,

its abrupt brutal horn in my brain.

People wade toward their occupations.

You allow me to kiss your unimaginable breasts,

the home of your youthfulness.

You arch in bed,

the muscular trough of your back

amazes me.

I bend down to savor

your salty dew.

Read More

Happy Friday, says we at the Dodge, but please, oh please, don’t do anything stupid. Come Monday, you may have regrets (if you are within the 20-30 camp, it’s part of the game) but always remember to stay on the bus and keep trucking along.
Best,
Artful Dodge 
P.S. - Is it still okay to write TGIF? 

Happy Friday, says we at the Dodge, but please, oh please, don’t do anything stupid. Come Monday, you may have regrets (if you are within the 20-30 camp, it’s part of the game) but always remember to stay on the bus and keep trucking along.

Best,

Artful Dodge 

P.S. - Is it still okay to write TGIF?